Left For Dead, Radio Adapts To A Digital World

Left For Dead, Radio Adapts To A Digital World

First it was TV that was going to kill off radio, sending it to an early and untimely death. But radio hung in and even thrived. Then it was the internet that was going to finish the job once and for all! But radio shrugged (at least metaphorically), adapted and even capitalized on its supposed foe, the internet, to get its message to the masses. And that’s why to this day I can still proclaim that talk radio continues to be a wonderful venue for giving a boost both to your brand and to your credibility as an expert in your field. In fact, because of the internet, radio is better than ever for that purpose. We’re well past the days when listeners had to schedule their time around their favorite radio talk show. Now in many if not most cases those shows are archived on the station’s website, so people can listen to the show at their leisure, sitting down to enjoy it hours, days or even months after it originally aired. Additionally, one way hosts build their audiences these days is through social media, using Twitter, Facebook and other online sites to drive people to their shows. That’s good for you as well as for them if you plan to make talk radio part of your publicity efforts. And if you aren’t making use of talk radio, here are a few reasons why you should: You can leverage those interviews for an extra PR boost. It’s great if people take the time to tune in to your interview, but you can make excellent use of the interview...
Creativity And Persistence Can Separate You From The Pack In The Publicity Game

Creativity And Persistence Can Separate You From The Pack In The Publicity Game

Grabbing the media’s attention isn’t always easy. Each day, reporters, editors, TV producers and radio show hosts scroll through a never-ending barrage of email messages, many of which they no doubt delete without even bothering to read. Let’s face it, they couldn’t write about or report on all those topics even if they wanted to! Time just doesn’t allow it. With competition for the media’s attention so fierce, how do you separate yourself from the pack and land an interview that will help build your credibility as a go-to expert in your field? I’d love to be able to reveal to you a super-secret strategy that will work every time, all the time! Sadly, that’s not the case. Sometimes you just have to get inventive, allowing those creative juices to flow as you brainstorm alone or with others about pitches that might resonate with a show host or article angles that will intrigue an editor. That’s what we do each day at EMSI. Sometimes those pitches and angles come easily – and we’re excited as we put them into action! Sometimes they don’t percolate so quickly – and in those cases we are even more excited when the right approach finally comes to us! There’s nothing like that PR eureka moment! But while no strategy is absolutely foolproof, there are some approaches you can take that definitely will increase your odds of success. They include: Follow the news. This is something we do every day on behalf of our clients. You increase your chances of getting the media’s attention if your pitch aligns with something people in the news...
How To Give Journalists What They Need – And Avoid Irritating Them

How To Give Journalists What They Need – And Avoid Irritating Them

A big part of the publicity game is attracting the attention of the media and persuading them to interview you. But what happens when you’ve been successful in getting the media to look your way, only to find yourself wide-eyed, nervous and murmuring, “What now?” Governors, mayors and assorted movie stars and athletes are accustomed to talking with reporters, so they generally know what to do and what not to do in such encounters. The average person doesn’t have the same track record, so when they finally land an interview they can unintentionally sabotage their relationship with the reporter before it gets off the ground. This comes from a mixture of not knowing the media rules of engagement and failing to understand that the interview is really about what the journalist wants – not what you want. For example, one no-no is to ask to see a reporter’s notes or finished article before the article is published. For a variety of reasons, most reporters won’t agree to such requests – and some of them will be downright insulted and irritated that you asked. So don’t! Here are a few other tips to help make the interview run more smoothly and to have the journalist singing your praises afterward: Don’t be late. Whether your interview is by phone or in person, be on time! Journalists are on tight deadlines and if you don’t show up on schedule you’re risking that they will move on to another source. Sure, you’re a busy person, too, but you don’t want to leave the journalist waiting. With any luck, you can build a relationship...
Want More Print Coverage? Offer Up Your Own Articles

Want More Print Coverage? Offer Up Your Own Articles

One often overlooked means of getting great publicity is to contribute articles you wrote yourself to publications. Not only does your published byline boost your visibility, it provides an excellent credential. While many of the major national publications don’t accept unsolicited articles, some do set aside space for contributor columns or accept guest columns on their op-ed pages. The New York Daily News and Newsmax, for instance, have published many articles written by our clients. In some cases, these articles have drawn the attention of other media, leading to more exposure for our clients. Smaller publications, trade magazines and online publications also may be good places for your articles to land. These publications often have small staffs, so they’re happy to get well-written articles that they don’t have to pay for. Your reward is the publicity you’ll receive because you’ll likely get a credit line that includes your website and email. To help get you started on the path to publication, here are some do’s and don’ts: Look for submission guidelines on the publication’s website – and follow them! Some publications post their rules for submitting unsolicited articles. They may outline the topics they’re interested in, minimum and/or maximum word counts, and the style. If you find guidelines, stick to them! The No. 1 mistake people make is going over the maximum word count. That will very likely get your article rejected. And, since editors often don’t tell you why they’re rejecting the article, the writer keeps repeating the mistake. Pitch your ideas before writing a full article.  While with some publications you can submit a full article, you can save...
Written A Book? The Next Step Is To Get It Reviewed

Written A Book? The Next Step Is To Get It Reviewed

I’ve long advocated writing a book as an extremely effective way to market your personal brand, and I’m happy to report that more and more professionals – doctors, lawyers, financial professionals, CEOs and others – have come to recognize the value of this. After all, why slip a potential client a business card when you can dazzle them by handing them a copy of the book you wrote?! But even when your book is mainly for marketing purposes and you don’t harbor dreams of bestseller status, you wouldn’t mind if a few people actually took the time to read it. After all, you’ve put a lot of time, energy and perhaps a piece of your soul into it. So you’d like for it to get at least a smidgen of attention in the world beyond your closest friends and relatives. And that’s where book reviews come in! Wait! Before we go further, one important factor to be aware of is that the number of books published each year is tremendous. Sources can vary on exactly how tremendous, but the range is somewhere between 600,000 to 1 million! That means you’ve got a ton of competition for grabbing the attention of those book reviewers and, ultimately, readers. (And in case you were wondering, the average book sells fewer than 250 copies.) All those deflating numbers aside, a glowing book review could be the validation you’ve been seeking for all your hard work! Of course, some reviews glow in a friendly sort of way while others are downright radioactive, so realize you’re taking a chance when you start soliciting reviews. Still,...
Timing is Everything When Big News Happens

Timing is Everything When Big News Happens

An otherwise quiet Friday in our office quickly ratcheted up to high-alert level this past week when a major news story broke and journalists from far and wide pounded on our doors – or at least our email inboxes! Just like that, our print-campaign team was extraordinarily busy – and extraordinarily thrilled! We happened to have the right client for the right moment – and soon he was just as busy as we were, fielding media questions with professional aplomb. You probably heard about the event that launched the frenzy. It was the announcement that Amazon was buying Whole Foods, a business transaction that raised this intriguing question: How would this affect the brands of both companies, as well as the brands of their competitors? Our client, who soon became the media’s best buddy for the day, happens to be an international branding expert. Our team immediately understood that we could tie him to this major breaking news event in an impactful way. We crafted a quick pitch and sent it right off to our contacts at major publications. The response was downright explosive! Within an hour we heard from journalists at major publications like CNBC, USA Today, NBCnews.com, the Houston Chronicle, and others all vying to interview our client. We jumped on the rapidly arriving requests and arranged interview after interview after interview. Within the hour we began seeing the articles these news sites posted. And shortly after we got notice that over 60 other publications ran the USA Today story. Even LinkedIn got in the act. If you’re one of those people puzzled about the value of...