Seeing Your PR Campaign In 4-D

Seeing Your PR Campaign In 4-D

With movies such as “Logan,” “Alien: Covenant” and many others being filmed in 3-D these days, I started thinking about how a good PR campaign also has its own 3-D elements. Although since there are four types of media outlets – TV, radio, social media and print (offline and online) – what you really need is a 4-D strategy. (Yes, I’m sure those brilliant physicists Sheldon and Leonard from TV’s “Big Bang Theory” would take issue with my science.) In PR, unlike movies, 4-D is the only way to go. I mention this because people frequently ask me which of those four media options is better.  I try to explain that each is effective in its own right. But since the media feeds off itself, the most effective PR campaign will include using all elements in a strategy that leverages a 4-dimensional approach. Here are some ways the different elements of a 4-dimensional PR campaign fit together: Print/Online – I put print and online in the same category because they both encompass written articles, and just about everything that appears in print is repurposed online. That means written articles have a dual impact. Most importantly, every article or column that includes a mention of you, your book or your company eventually will appear online, meaning you’re just a Google search away from potential customers or clients. Also, an enterprising TV producer or radio show host who’s interested in interviewing you can find those articles, and that can help confirm for them that you’re a credible expert in your field. Those articles also are great fodder for social networks. Being...
How To Make The Most Out Of A Radio Interview

How To Make The Most Out Of A Radio Interview

If you’ve just landed an interview on talk radio, congratulations are in order because this is a great venue for giving a boost to your brand and to your credibility as an expert in your field. But maybe you’re a tad nervous and feeling the pressure. After all, you’re starting to realize that you’ll have a relatively short time to get your message out there and say what you have to say. Then the interview will end and the words you uttered will disappear silently into the airwaves – forever. Or will they? If you handle things the right way, a radio interview can live a lot longer than the 10 to 20 minutes you spend on the air chatting with a host. You can repurpose that interview so it continues to pay branding dividends for as long as you want it to. So just how do you get the most marketing mileage out of radio interviews? Your first step is to make sure you have an audio recording of the time you and the host spent conversing about and exploring your topic. The good news is an increasing number of talk radio stations post their guest interviews on their websites as podcasts and leave them there in the archives for a very long time after they’ve aired. Links to these podcasts are gold! However, if that’s not the case, you could ask the show host or producer to provide an Mp3 of the interview, but there’s no guarantee they’ll come through for you. They might be nice folks willing to do you a favor, but they really have...
Talk Radio Is Your Connection To A Dedicated And Eager Audience

Talk Radio Is Your Connection To A Dedicated And Eager Audience

In today’s world there are plenty of ways to get your message out and build your brand, from print to TV to the ever-growing influence of social media. But perhaps no medium connects you as intimately to an audience as does talk radio, where eager listeners tune in to hear a favorite host chat with guests on topics ranging from politics to health care to finance and beyond. I was recently reminded in an unusual way of just how strong the connection between listeners and talk-show guests can be. One long-time EMSI client has been making use of talk radio for years, and we’ve booked hundreds of interviews for him, allowing him to voice his message that combines economics with a return to traditional values and a religious viewpoint. He pays little regard to market size or station ratings because he understands the value of that intimate connection he is able to make with talk show listeners. If there was ever any doubt that he makes a connection, that doubt has been erased. Out of the blue, we heard from a radio listener in the Grand Rapids, Mich., area who had listened to an interview with our client some time ago. She wanted us to pass along an urgent message to him, asking for his prayers because she thought she was going to lose her house. At a time when her world was collapsing, she remembered that radio interview and wanted to make a personal connection with our client whose message had so deeply touched her. Yes, a random radio listener reaching out to us to communicate with one...
Yes! Talk Radio Is Still A Great Venue For Public Relations

Yes! Talk Radio Is Still A Great Venue For Public Relations

A day in my life usually involves phone or email conversations with prospective clients. They always have questions about how they can better their position to promote their personal or business brands. But one line of questioning I find mystifying deals with talk radio, a medium I love and we’ve made great use of for our clients. The question: “Does anyone actually listen to talk radio anymore?” Now, from my own experience, I could answer with an emphatic “absolutely!” But I decided a higher authority from the world of talk radio would be more credible. So I checked with my friend, Michael Harrison, publisher of TALKERS magazine, the industry’s top trade magazine. Michael is even more emphatic than I am. Since the modern era of talk radio began in the late 1980s, he says, its detractors have been quick to point to every blemish or minor ratings downtick as indicating the death of the format. They could not be more wrong. “If no one is listening to talk radio, then no one is listening to radio at all,” Michael says. “With the normal ups and downs inherent in any format of the medium, talk radio (and country music radio) remain the two most-listened-to genres of radio, ratings period after ratings period.” Is talk radio important and influential? Michael says you might as well ask if voters are influential and if consumers are influential. “Research continues to indicate that talk radio is where a high concentration of voters and active consumers are indeed listening,” he says. “Talk radio also puts the spotlight on important issues that, for reasons of ratings,...

Why Talk Radio Remains A Great Venue For Publicity

A day in my life usually involves phone or email conversations with prospective clients.  They always have questions about how they can better their position to promote themselves and/or their business. But one line of questioning I always find mystifying deals with talk radio, a medium I love and we’ve made great use of for our clients over the years. The question they ask is: “Does anyone actually listen to talk radio anymore?” Now, from my own experience, I could answer that with an emphatic “absolutely!” But I decided a higher authority from the world of talk radio would be more credible. So I checked in with my friend, Michael Harrison, publisher of Talkers magazine, the industry’s top trade magazine, to see how he would respond. It turns out Michael was even more emphatic than me. Since the modern era of talk radio began in the late 1980s, he says, its detractors have been quick to point to every blemish or minor ratings down-tick as indicating the death of the format. They could not be more wrong. “If no one is listening to talk radio, then no one is listening to radio at all,” Michael says. “With the normal ups and downs inherent in any format of the medium, talk radio (and country music radio) remain the two most-listened-to genres of radio, ratings period after ratings period.” Is talk radio important and influential? Michael says you might as well ask if voters are influential and if active consumers are influential. “Research continues to indicate that talk radio is where a high concentration of voters and active consumers are indeed...
Why Talk Radio May Be Your Best Bet for Publicity

Why Talk Radio May Be Your Best Bet for Publicity

What’s the most effective traditional medium for getting publicity to promote your business or service? That depends on your audience and your message. You may find more of your target demographics among magazine readers than TV audiences, or among talk radio listeners than newspaper readers. Most likely, though, you’ll find at least some segment using each of the traditional news media – the newspapers and other publications, TV talk shows and talk radio. A trickier problem is identifying where your message will get the best reception. Print editors and news talk show hosts and producers are looking for content – articles and guest interviews – that will interest their audiences. Local and national daytime TV talk shows tend to like lighter subject matter and topics that women find helpful. Print publications, both the paper kind and those publishing online, gravitate toward articles linked to the news of the day. AM/FM and satellite talk radio has a place for all of the above – and lots more, which is one reason I’ve been an avid listener forever. I’ve also been a syndicated show host, and I’ve been getting clients talk radio publicity for 24 years. I am, emphatically, a diehard talk radio fan. Now that radio has fully embraced digital media, it has become even more valuable as a publicity tool. I asked fellow radio lover Alex Hinojosa, our vice president of media operations and a major-market radio personality for 17 years, to share some of talk radio’s distinct advantages. Because he’s spent so much time on the other side, I wanted you to hear his perspective: Guests get unedited...