Nurturing A Relationship With Your Hometown Press Can Pay Dividends

Nurturing A Relationship With Your Hometown Press Can Pay Dividends

Let’s face it, grabbing the attention of the national media can be exciting, a marketing coup that gives your brand coast-to-coast publicity in front of a wide and diverse audience. Believe me, as a public relations professional I understand as well as anyone the allure of such attention and why it is so enticing to so many. But national exposure isn’t the only exposure that’s important. I also believe it’s worthwhile to nurture relationships with your hometown news media so that when they have a sudden need for an expert on your topic, your name bubbles to the top of their list. Just last week, we enjoyed such a moment at EMSI when a television news crew from WFLA Channel 8 in Tampa needed to interview a social media strategist for a story about a teenage boy accused of using Snapchat to threaten a teenage girl. The boy told the girl he would post explicit photos he had of her if she didn’t send him more photos. For the uninitiated, Snapchat is an app that allows you to share a quick photo or video with a friend. The gimmick with Snapchat is that the photo or video is supposed to disappear in 10 seconds or less, presumably tossed down a cyberspace black hole, never to be seen again. Skeptical of that? Me, too! Ditto for the news crew, who wanted someone who could discuss whether that’s really the case, and also to speak with authority on the dangers of posting anything on social media that you wouldn’t want your Aunt Mabel to see. The reporter telephoned Russ Handler, our...
How to Get on the Ellen Show: Part 2

How to Get on the Ellen Show: Part 2

Days after My PR Insider About the Popular Talk Show, Ellen Plugs Our Client! I don’t believe in coincidence; everything happens for a reason. I got a reminder of that recently thanks to a wonderful, and somewhat eerie, experience here at the office. The story I’m about to share is a great illustration of how publicity works – how coverage begets coverage and how exposure in one medium can lead to even more exposure in another. What’s a bit eerie is the timing: Two days after I sent out a PR Insider titled “How to Get on the Ellen Show,” one of our clients got a nice business plug in Ellen’s monologue. The comedienne’s popular daytime talk show has replaced The Oprah Winfrey Show as the No. 1 most desired media placement by people seeking publicity – at least in my experience. The Ellen DeGeneres Show reportedly averages 8 million viewers (Oprah averaged 7.4 million) and Ellen has won more than 30 Daytime Emmy Awards. She’s also known to give non-celebrities a chance in the spotlight, so folks view her show as a bit more accessible than others. In the PR Insider about getting on the Ellen show, I advised you to start getting local publicity. Why? Because one way producers find interesting stories is by scouring local media – many top-tier shows even pay staff solely to read local media. How did it happen for our client? He signed on with us a few months ago for print, radio and TV campaigns to get visibility and credibility for his new dating website, YouMustLoveDogsDating.com. We came up with some...
Find Great Publicity on Local TV Stations

Find Great Publicity on Local TV Stations

I often emphasize the need for a multi-media approach to public relations: getting your message out on at least a couple of the traditional media (radio, print, TV) that your target audience is using while also building your social media marketing. But people sometimes tell me, “I just don’t have time for lots of radio and TV interviews, or the travel required for TV. Is there something I can do that’s quick and effective?” Of course, some messages are best suited for certain media, and your particular target demographic may mostly use one or two media and not the others. But, that said, one of the best – and most overlooked – publicity options is your own hometown TV shows. Why? They give you a large audience and visibility in the most powerful of the traditional media. Viewers tend to connect with and remember people they see on TV because it’s such a multi-sensory experience. If you come across as warm and likeable, they’ll remember that! If you’re hoping to eventually appear on national TV, local interviews are a necessary steppingstone. Most national shows want to see how you come across on TV before they’ll put you on the air. They want to see that you have good energy, that your appearance matches your expertise and that you can communicate your message well. Clips of local TV interviews posted on your website will continue to pay dividends long after the show has aired. They boost your credibility to new website visitors by providing that all-important third-party endorsement by the show host. It doesn’t matter that the show didn’t air...
How to Avoid Wardrobe Malfunctions and Other Live TV ‘Oops!’

How to Avoid Wardrobe Malfunctions and Other Live TV ‘Oops!’

Article at a glance: Even the pros occasionally stumble on live TV If it happens to you, smile and keep talking. Be conscious of your body movements. It’s bad enough when you stick your foot in your mouth at a dinner party or walk out of the office bathroom with the back of your dress tucked into your underwear (no that wasn’t me, thank goodness). It’s a whole lot worse when your red-faced moment is beamed to thousands – or millions – of television viewers. I’m sure Janet Jackson never intended to bust out of her bustier during the Super Bowl halftime show in 2004. Talk about a shot heard ‘round the world! More recently, President Obama demonstrated that even the leader of the free world is not immune from the live slip-up when he was caught on a hot mic asking Russian President Medvedev to wait until after he’s re-elected to talk missiles. Less memorable – but preserved on the Internet for all the world to share – are the TV anchors and show hosts who forget the cameras are rolling, drop four-letter words or explode in giggles. You can avoid the “oops,” though, by keeping these don’ts in mind: Don’t look at the monitor: The first thing you’ll notice when you take a seat on the TV set are monitors showing all the camera angles, cameramen (or robots!) rolling the cameras to different positions and producers darting around the set. Forget them. Look at the person interviewing you, as if the two of you were at your kitchen table having a cup of coffee. Don’t let a...
Getting Results: How Timing and Creativity Can Get You Booked

Getting Results: How Timing and Creativity Can Get You Booked

Just last week, I showed you an interview I did with Lisa Hess, our TV campaign manager, about a typical day in her life here at EMSI. In it, we learned a lot of the different things she does in order to get our clients booked. Although I can always count on Lisa to arrange good TV bookings each week, last week she outdid herself with 4 national TV appearances and 5 local TV appearances on network affiliate stations. So I thought it might be helpful as a follow-up to share with you how she got these bookings.