How To Make The Most Out Of A Radio Interview

How To Make The Most Out Of A Radio Interview

If you’ve just landed an interview on talk radio, congratulations are in order because this is a great venue for giving a boost to your brand and to your credibility as an expert in your field.

But maybe you’re a tad nervous and feeling the pressure. After all, you’re starting to realize that you’ll have a relatively short time to get your message out there and say what you have to say.

Then the interview will end and the words you uttered will disappear silently into the airwaves – forever.

Or will they?

If you handle things the right way, a radio interview can live a lot longer than the 10 to 20 minutes you spend on the air chatting with a host. You can repurpose that interview so it continues to pay branding dividends for as long as you want it to.

So just how do you get the most marketing mileage out of radio interviews?

Your first step is to make sure you have an audio recording of the time you and the host spent conversing about and exploring your topic.

The good news is an increasing number of talk radio stations post their guest interviews on their websites as podcasts and leave them there in the archives for a very long time after they’ve aired. Links to these podcasts are gold!

However, if that’s not the case, you could ask the show host or producer to provide an Mp3 of the interview, but there’s no guarantee they’ll come through for you. They might be nice folks willing to do you a favor, but they really have no particular incentive to take the time and effort to do this. It’s wonderful if it happens, but don’t count on it!

You could also pay for a monitoring company to record your interviews for you. That way someone does have motivation – your money – to see it through.

But the best option is to purchase a device for recording phone conversations. These are reasonably inexpensive and if you have your own recording device you aren’t counting on anyone else to come through for you. It’s all in your hands.

Regardless of how you go about it, though, once you’ve recorded the interview, what do you do with it?

There are a few ways you can repurpose that interview so that you can continue to reap the benefits and use it to build your authority as an expert long after your voice faded from the listeners’ radios:

  • Share the recording. Post it on your website so that anyone who visits you there can listen to it with the click of mouse. You can also use your social media platforms to post or tweet links to the interview, which has the added benefit of driving more traffic to your website. Finally, you can share it with clients or prospective clients by sending a link through your email marketing list.
  • Transcribe it. A lot of words are said in a radio interview, and you can do more with those words than just ask others to listen to them. If you transcribe the interview, you’ll have content that you can edit and rework to create blog posts or articles for your website.
  • Use it as the starting point for your book. If you’re considering writing a book (and you should be), the transcribed interview can give you great content for that as well. It will provide an excellent starting point and you can expand from there. By the same token, you also could use the message that you shared with radio listeners as the foundation for any public speaking presentations you do.

My friend Michael Harrison, radio industry expert and publisher of TALKERS magazine, the industry’s No. 1 trade publication, says, “Links to a guest’s radio interviews are today’s convenient version of press clippings. They are trophies indicating the reality of the guest’s importance and recognition in our increasingly noisy media world. They should be collected and redistributed with pride because they, indeed, have priceless ongoing impact.”

There’s also at least one other way you can use your recording of the interview, though it really doesn’t count as repurposing. You can listen to the interview again – and again and again – to critique how well you did and what you might do differently the next time you get the opportunity to go on the air.

After a few interviews, you’ll realize that many of the radio hosts ask similar questions. You’ll begin to massage and tighten your answers so you can make sure the listeners receive the important message you want them to hear.

Play it again!

Marsha

P.S. If you want to be a guest on national and local talk radio shows across the country, give us a call at 727-443-7115 ext. 215.

 

 

About Marsha Friedman
Marsha Friedman launched EMS Incorporated in 1990. Her firm represents corporations and experts in a wide array of fields such as business, health, food, lifestyle, politics, finance, law, sports and entertainment. She consults individuals and businesses on a daily basis and is frequently asked to speak at conferences about how to harness the power of publicity.

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